telecollaboration

Monolingual Ideologies and Plurilingual Realities

Monolingual Ideologies and Plurilingual Realities

Two weeks ago, I attended the Integrationists Conference at Penn State University, whose theme was “Integrationism and Philosophies of Language: Emerging Alternative Epistemologies in the Global North and the Global South”

While I had not heard of Integrationism as a linguistic theory until I saw the announcement for this conference, I was interested in learning more about both Integrationism and Southern Theories, as they seemed to align with the direction my own research is taking.  As it turns out, this was an excellent choice! I got to meet up with some of my favorite study abroad colleagues, and also learn from presenters that came from a wide range of disciplines, theoretical backgrounds and geographical locations.  In this post, I’m giving a summary of my own presentation called “Monolingual Ideologies and Plurilingual Realities: U.S. Arabic Learners in Study Abroad and Telecollaboration”.  

Telecollaboration in the Language Classroom: Challenges and Benefits

Telecollaboration in the Language Classroom: Challenges and Benefits

Although telecollaboration is one of my research contexts, I realized I’ve never written a post about it.  So, here is a long overdue discussion of telecollaboration, the projects I’ve been involved in, and the lessons I’ve learned.